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Recommended Reads – 19 March 2011

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Following the massive earthquake and tsunamis in Japan late last week, people around the world have been moved to donate money to help aid efforts, many through Web-based credit card donations and text messaging. With instant giving enabled through mobile phones in particular, it’s important to make sure your donation is going to a credible organization. How to Avoid Japan Donation Scams | News & Opinion | PCMag.com

With the rising awareness and concern over the stealing of passwords and other sensitive data from unsecured Wi-Fi networks, Twitter is the latest online services company to boost its use of encrypted website connections. Twitter Adds Option to Always Use HTTPS Connection – PCWorld

Five more security suites have arrived on the scene since PCMag’s last suite roundup. Two of them, Kaspersky PURE Total Security and Norton 360 Version 5.0, are "mega-suite" extensions of existing high-end suites. Another, Outpost Security Suite Free 7.0, goes the other way. It’s a free version of Outpost’s Pro suite with a few features (and tech support) removed. With these 5 included, that makes a whopping 21 suites for 2011 that we’ve tested so far. Here’s a rundown of what these suites offer. The Best Security Suites for 2011 | PCMag.com

Passwords, banking records, social media accounts—day by day our lives create more and more data. But what becomes of all that data when we pass away is a looming problem with no clear answer. What Happens To Your Online Data When You Die? – Popular Mechanics

Gary LosHuertos parked himself in a New York City cafe last fall and fired up a new tool for snooping on people as they use free wireless. Within minutes, he had managed to spy on more than a dozen people as they used Facebook. It was just an experiment by the Web software expert, but he wanted to make a point — so he used the victims’ own Facebook accounts to send them each an unnerving warning message. He told them he’d hacked their accounts, and he knew where they were. Why should I care about digital privacy? – Technology & science – msnbc.com

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